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Movies have a tremendous amount of planning and execution behind the scenes. Often the scenes which appear simple can have tremendous amounts of production behind it. There is often more than meets the eye. My team & I, went ahead to recreate one movie still from “Wake Up Sid”.

wakeupsid_original

The above was the original shot from the movie which we set on to recreate. Following is what we accomplished.

wakeupside_recreate

The lighting for the shot was a strip & a grid from male’s actor shoulder and couple of cutters to avoid spillage. The grid illuminated the female’s face too along with providing a slight edge light to the male actor. Behind the female was a light on grid pointed at male actor’s face and another light with a snoot for hair light on female. Editing was to crop in a similar aspect ratio along-with basic adjustments. The scene was shot at f/8, 1/50th at ISO 100.

I can see a room from improvement but this exercise taught me a lot. It requires proper planning and execution even for light which feels simple. Kudos to the film production, lighting, art direction, DOP & various other team which work in cooperation to produce such good to watch films. Even if you are a photographer, it pays to watch films. You can learn a great deal about lighting from movies. At the end of the day, they are simply 24 stills(fps) encompassed in a second.

Optical Slave Unit

Optical Slave Triggers – a piece of accessory which is tremendously useful if you work with strobes/speedlights. These are tiny in size but can help you accomplish wonderful photographs. It simply is a light sensitive sensor within which senses the light and triggers the circuit which then ultimately triggers the attached strobe or speedlight.
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Ganesh Visarjan in Mumbai

Ganesh Chaturthi has begun & it’s already in the third day. The city is painted with the fervor as the elephant headed lord makes his stay in homes of the devotees. Yesterday, some bid adieu to their lord at the completion of 1.5 days. The chowpatty painted colored scenes. Here is a glimpse through my lens.

_MG_0313-2
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Timing in Photography

An important aspect of photography is ‘timing’. Often a millisecond separates a snapshot from an award winning shot. Timing comes only from proper judgment and foresight of the situation. A photographer should be patient & calm as he shoots.

Timing1
Timing2
Timing3

Out of the above three images, the second one is perfectly timed. It tells a story. The rest two are simply snapshots with no engaging quality. The three were taken just a few milliseconds apart.

Altering a process priority is indispensable when you wish to change the behaviour of a running program on the system. Most of the times, when one wants a program to complete its processing faster, tuning its priority holds the key.

Under Linux, this can be accomplished by two ways – GUI & CLI. For this article, we will look at changing a process priority the GUI way. The CLI warrants a separate article.

Once you have the process running, simply open the “System Monitor”. Do note, I am under KDE for this demonstration. So the system monitor options may vary as per your desktop environment. However, the corresponding options should be self explanatory.

Process Priority GUI

Once in System Monitor, click on the “Process Table” tab for a summary of running processes on the system. Here identify your program. In my case, I wished to increase the priority of the Openshot process so it may process my video faster. So upon highlighting the Openshot Video Editor’s process in the table, I hit F8.You should now notice a similar window like one shown above. Here drag the sliders to the right for faster processing. You will be prompted for the root password as you do so. That’s all, the process should now conclude faster.

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