Tag Archive: Linux


Photo collage make for a wonderful gift. It makes for a good gift since one can include photographs shot across various time-line of a relation which when looked back brings immense satisfaction. Being a photographer, my friends have been receiving such photo collages from me. To make this collage, I use a nifty piece of software known as “FotoWall”.

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Installing Flash Player in Arch Linux

Flash is often used on the web in form of videos, games & other flash based web applications. Love it or hate it but you can’t escape it atleast for now.Thus it becomes necessary to install flash plugin on your system in order to make sure all those flash content work flawlessly in your web browser. Here I’ll guide you to install flash plugin on your Arch Linux system(32 Bit & 64 Bit).

First, you’ll need to edit the pacman configuration file of Arch Linux i.e. ‘/etc/pacman.conf’. This can be done by issuing following at the shell;

vi /etc/pacman.conf

Once the file is loaded in the shell, scroll down & find the repository section. Under repository section enable the ‘Multilib’ repository by deleting the ‘#’ symbol from front of it. This is known as uncommenting. It should look like this after uncommenting.

[multilib] Include = /etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist

After the above is done, issue the following command to refresh & sync the enabled repositories.

# pacman -Syu

Now that we have repositories refreshed, its time to install the flashplayer like any other software using pacman. For that issue,

# pacman -S flashplayer

Now the 32 bit flashplayer is installed on your system. Verify it by typing ‘about:plugins’ in address bar of Mozilla Firefox. Try loading a youtube video or any flash site and it should work without any issues.

Who doesn’t loves statistics? Ever wanted to know how many users use GNU/LINUX? How many use a particular distro? Below are two sites which keep a track of Linux users. One can get his machine registered to get into the official Linux universe. Furthermore you can even use the badge to showcase in forum signature or on your website.

Linux Counter

Ubuntu Counter

If you know counters for other linux distros, mention them in comments so that I can merge them in the main post.

Most often its not the case that you have only one application open at a particular time on your computer. With hardware becoming cheaper & faster, multi-tasking has become a norm. Its a common sight today to have a media-player, web browser, chat client & an image editor all running in real-time on one’s desktop. Though the computers can handle such multi-tasking the user’s productivity most often than not gets crippled. Blame it on to the cluttered desktop for the decrease in productivity. Half of the user’s time is wasted in finding the right application window. Grouping similar windows is handy but still not too much either. However, most of the user’s are unaware of the feature called ‘Workspaces’ in Linux Desktop Environments. Almost all desktop environment offer this feature enabled by default. It is set to 2 or 4 workspaces by default but can be altered to provide many more.

The logic behind workspaces is to shift the applications across multiple virtual desktops. A virtual desktop is identical to your default desktop. With Workspaces, you can divide the open applications across different desktops(virtual). For e.g. You can group all Internet programs like Browser, Chat Clients, Torrent Clients, FTP Clients etc on Workspace 1, Media Players & Image Editors on Workspace 2 & so on. Applications can be shifted from current workspace to other workspace in many ways but the simplest is to right click on the panel where the running applications are listed, right clicking on them & then selecting “Move to another workspace” under GNOME.

You can switch between different workspace by clicking on the tiny boxes(Workspace Applet) which appears at bottom right on panel in GNOME or next to K Menu in an KDE environment. Alternately, press “CTRL+TAB+Right arrow” to shift to right workspace or “CTRL+TAB+Left arrow” to shift to left of the current workspace(The shortcuts may vary & you’re advised to check the applet’s settings for default shortcut setting). Workspace behaviour can be altered by right clicking on the workspace applet on GNOME panel & selecting “Preferences” from the sub-menu. The options there are self explanatory & so I leave it for you to explore & set as per your preference. There you have, an organised & clutter free desktop to work on with improved productivity.

Installing software under Linux doesn’t require one to hit the console anymore. Thanks to the graphical package managers available which have made the job of installing, uninstalling & updating software packages a child’s play. Still knowing how to manage software via console is necessary to make yourself a competent Linux user. In this first post I will cover installing software under Debian Linux. I will follow this post with installing softwares on Redhat, installing from source etc.
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