Tag Archive: KDE


Over the time, your operating system tends to generate temporary files which get on accumulating in the temporary directories. This negatively affects the system responsiveness & off-course wastes disk space. Further, there are also other resources like browser caches, thumbnail caches & more which if not cleared from time to time make the system sluggish. An advance user may very well take control & go rectifying each of the above problems. However that would mean more time to clear up each individual thing. Here, steps in to rescue is KDE’s very own utility – Sweeper(Application>Utilities>Sweeper).

Sweeper
As the name suggests, Sweeper is a tiny utility which lets one clear all the unwanted clutter from the system. The interface of sweeper is ridiculously idiot-proof & all the options are self explanatory. Simply check whatever you wish to get rid off from your system & hit “Clean Up”. Sweeper is capable of clearing cookies, temporary files, thumbnail cache, browser cache, favicons, clipboard, recently used document list, recent applications etc.

From time to time, I recommend running Sweeper & letting it do its job. It will ensure you good disk resources & a responsive computer.

Batch Resize Photographs in Digikam

Photographers often need to resize hundreds or even thousands of picture from time to time. Manually resizing each photographs one by one will ensure you do not get time to do any other things & missing submission deadlines. The solution to this answer is “Batch Resize”. As the name suggests, it means resizing photos in large quantities in one go. In this article, I’ll show you how to resize photographs in Digikam.

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Most often its not the case that you have only one application open at a particular time on your computer. With hardware becoming cheaper & faster, multi-tasking has become a norm. Its a common sight today to have a media-player, web browser, chat client & an image editor all running in real-time on one’s desktop. Though the computers can handle such multi-tasking the user’s productivity most often than not gets crippled. Blame it on to the cluttered desktop for the decrease in productivity. Half of the user’s time is wasted in finding the right application window. Grouping similar windows is handy but still not too much either. However, most of the user’s are unaware of the feature called ‘Workspaces’ in Linux Desktop Environments. Almost all desktop environment offer this feature enabled by default. It is set to 2 or 4 workspaces by default but can be altered to provide many more.

The logic behind workspaces is to shift the applications across multiple virtual desktops. A virtual desktop is identical to your default desktop. With Workspaces, you can divide the open applications across different desktops(virtual). For e.g. You can group all Internet programs like Browser, Chat Clients, Torrent Clients, FTP Clients etc on Workspace 1, Media Players & Image Editors on Workspace 2 & so on. Applications can be shifted from current workspace to other workspace in many ways but the simplest is to right click on the panel where the running applications are listed, right clicking on them & then selecting “Move to another workspace” under GNOME.

You can switch between different workspace by clicking on the tiny boxes(Workspace Applet) which appears at bottom right on panel in GNOME or next to K Menu in an KDE environment. Alternately, press “CTRL+TAB+Right arrow” to shift to right workspace or “CTRL+TAB+Left arrow” to shift to left of the current workspace(The shortcuts may vary & you’re advised to check the applet’s settings for default shortcut setting). Workspace behaviour can be altered by right clicking on the workspace applet on GNOME panel & selecting “Preferences” from the sub-menu. The options there are self explanatory & so I leave it for you to explore & set as per your preference. There you have, an organised & clutter free desktop to work on with improved productivity.

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