Tag Archive: Colour


With the recent Adobe Flash Player update(11.2) in Linux, there seems to be a major color glitch in flash videos for users using Nvidia graphic cards. When viewing flash videos, a user experiences the colors being reversed/altered like you’re watching a negative slide of a film. Imagine, watching a red Ferrari in stark blue & the skin tones of humans being transformed to that of folks from the movie Avatar. Yes, its really frustrating. Updating the Nvidia drivers to the latest won’t work.

To fix this colour glitch, unfortunately one needs to disable hardware acceleration for videos. To disable hardware acceleration, open up a youtube video, right click in the video area & select settings. In the first tab(Display) itself, you should get “Enable Hardware Acceleration” option with a checkmark in the radio box. Simply uncheck this & now try playing a video. If everything goes well, you should be able to view colours accurately.

Another option is to rollback to Adobe Flash 11.1, if you prefer not to disable hardware acceleration. I hope Adobe issues an update on this soon.

A flash-gun can do wonders to your photography. Simply using a flash in your photos can elevate them to a new level altogether. However, flash in his primary form is very unattractive & often needs to be used along-with other accessories like reflector, diffuser, flash gels etc to create the desired effect in the photographs. In this article, I’ll talk about flash gels. About creating flash gel for yourself.

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Do-It-Yourself : 18% Grey Card

If you’re serious about exposure & colour balance in your photographs, you must use an “18% Grey Card”. Though today Auto White Balance has come a long way & gives pretty great results most of the time, it does gets fooled at times under tricky mixed lighting situations. Here the grey card will come at your rescue. It will also prevent a lot of your time during post-processing & save you the hassle of correcting WB & exposure. In first part of this article, I’ll teach you how to make a 18% Grey Card for yourself. I highly recommend to make this DIY 18% Grey Card to understand(practise) about exposure & colour correction. This DIY 18% Grey Card isn’t technically perfect but will still give you close to accurate results in your photographs. Once you get a hang of exposure & colour corrections in depth, consider purchasing the commercially available Kodak 18% Grey Card for accurate results.

Things you’ll require:

1) Image Editing Software supporting Layers. I recommend GIMP, its great & free too.

2) Printer(Alternately go to your nearest cyber-cafe to take a printout)

3) White Card-Board(Thick)

The Instructions:

Click to Enlarge

1) Open GIMP. Hit File>New. In the new file creation dialog box, select A4(300ppi) & click OK.

2) Now go to Layer menu & select ‘Duplicate Layer‘.

3) Now press ‘Shift + B’ to select ‘Bucket Fill Tool’. Ensure that ‘Black’ colour is selected as foreground colour. Now click the cursor on the duplicated layer & the layer should be filled with black colour. Now from the GIMP toolbar adjust its opacity to 50%. Save the file as tiff.

4) Now just take a printout of this file on an A4 paper sheet. After that, cut the printed A4 sheet into four equal pieces & stick the pieces over the white card-board. Ensure you cut the card-board pieces slightly bigger than the grey card pieces so you can hand-hold them without ruining the grey area.

There you’ve it. Your 18% Grey Card is ready to use. Keep these four pieces in a ziplock bag & into your camera bag. In the next article, I’ll teach you how to use these grey cards.

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