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Ganesh Utsav 2013 – In Motion

I went all over the city to bring you the finest of the Ganesh idols. Here is my coverage of Ganesh Utsav 2013 right from the first day all the way till Visarjan. Most of the footage is shot hand-held except for a few shots. The footage was edited in OpenShot Video Editor which is a breeze to work with. The sound-track used is “Mourya Re” from the bollywood film Don. Enjoy the video. :-)

Shooting a Mitsubishi Pajero

Lumenatic did an absolute fab job at shooting a Ferrari in studio. Offcourse, you wouldn’t notice rightaway that it was a scale model of the real car. Inspired from him, I set on my journey to shoot the Mitsubishi Pajero scale model(1:24) which I had since my childhood days. Sure, its not in its original mint position but I had tons of fun shooting it. Not to forget, I learnt a lot about lighting.

The Monster in the Dark

To begin with I just used one light for the above shot as my secondary speedlight conked off. It also meant for the second shot, I had to rely on the natural window light in addition to speedlight.

Highkey Pajero

Let me know, how you feel about these shots.

Food photographs often are shot with careful plating, selective styling & generous lighting arrangement. However, one can even shoot food photographs with relative ease using absolutely basic resources at disposal.

If one is just beginning in food photography, most often he/she won’t have an array of crockery or extravagant lighting equipment to use. In this case, I recommend shooting the food in the same crockery you’re using to cook them.

Batata Bhaji

The above photograph you see, is a simple example of how one can create beautiful food photographs with limited resources. Here, the light used is window light. The food rests in the cooking pan in which it was cooked. To be honest, I did not even took the cooking pan from the cooking range as we have a window just above the kitchen platform providing beautiful light. I just added a spoon to the pan & took this from an top angle. I slightly controlled the light streaming from window in this case but not to a large degree. Editing was kept to minimal. Isn’t this mouth-watering?

So, get into the kitchen & shoot some beautiful shots with the limited resources you have. Happy Photography Day. :-)

The ‘Recent’ item under places in nautilus sidebar can be handy for accessing recent files on the system. However it can also be a privacy breach. There seems no easy setting to hide the ‘recent’ entry under places. Hiding the sidebar option will hide it completely. Here is a way to hide the ‘recent’ places under the file manager. Actually this does not hide the recent places, but does not allows any files to be listed there in the first place. After doing the following, you’ll see the ‘recent’ under places but there won’t be files listed in there.

The items shown under the recent are stored in a file which is dynamically modified as the user access the files over the system. Simply delete the file containing the recent items history using the following command.

$rm -rf ~/.local/share/recently-used.xbel

Now you’ll need to logout & relogin for changes to take effect. However this is only a one time solution. You’ll need to manually run this command from time to time to clear the recent items.

If you want to save this hassle, you can do the following changes to clear the recent items from not showing up at all. A permanent fix would be to first delete the above file. Now immediately before you open any of your documents(audio, video, text or any file), open a terminal & do the following.

$cd ~/.local/share/

$touch recently-used.xbel

$su

#chattr +i recently-used.xbel

That’s it & you’re done. Now ‘recent’ items under the sidebar will always be empty. To know more about the chattr command, read this post.

Food photography requires the viewer to salivate over the photograph. A good photograph always succeed in the viewer wanting to have the photographed food. However, since photography is static, we need to shoot it so that it tricks the mind into believing the underlying motion. Take for example, the steam captured in the food photograph makes the viewer feel its warmth & the steam also incites a ‘want to have right now’ feeling from the viewer. Believe it or not, a simple steam is a major element in food photographs. However creating steam is not a piece of cake. Here I’ll show you how can you create steam in your food photographs easily to make them more vibrant & appealing.

142-365

One can use the incense sticks(agarbatti) found at home to create steam. Simply light a few incense sticks & place them strategically in the frame so that they do not show up. The waft of steam from incense stick is pretty weak, so you’ll need at-least a couple to get the thick steam you desire. Also since, the burning incense stick outputs steam in a typical slender pattern, you’ll need to sculpt it with a paper fan. Alternately, one can even use dhoop sticks(thick incense sticks) to create a lot of steam. However, do note that incense sticks emit ash & that can mix easily with the food you’re photographing. Even the aroma of incense stick can mix with your food. So if you’re going to consume the food after photographing, using incense sticks is not a good idea. Also since the incense is burning there is always a risk of fire or props getting burnt, so be careful while placing & do monitor it time & again as you shoot.

Actually, creating steam with incense sticks is the most economical way to produce steam. Yes, it takes a lot of work to get the shape you desire & at-times it can be impractical for some foods. However, it does has the capability to spice up the occasional food shot. Off-course there are more better ways to create steam in food photography but that I’ll leave it to discuss for some other day.

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